1: Ecco la primavera

The ballata Ecco la primavera (Here is the spring), a composition by Francesco Landini, the Florentine composer, poet, organist, singer and instrument maker, is a hymn to the joy of life and of the senses. The text speaks of the green grass, the abundance of flowers, the decorated trees and of love. The ballata, originally a type of dance, is a characteristic style of italian secular music of the 14th and 15th centuries and is of cyclic form (ripresa – 2 piedi – volta - ripresa).


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2: I wanted my song to have one word

I wanted my song to have one word:  this phrase is the title and the only text of the piece. Close consonances and a gradually shifting succession/series of notes are characteristic of the whole piece, even of the electronic part. The words, borrowed once more from a friend, the poet Dimitris Kosmopoulos. (Total Eclipse, coll. Dead Brother’s, Kedros edit.)


Dora Panagopoulou


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3: Lamento di Tristano

Lamento di Tristano (Tristan’s Lament) is a sample / an example of monophonic Italian dance of the 14th century. It is an estampie in two parts most probaly composed for solo viela. The first part is slow and melancholic while the rotta that follows is energetic and enthusiastic. This compostion is part of a tradition that exists since the 12th century according to which dances come in pairs, the slow dance preceeding the fast one, they usually have similar/common musical material but they are opposite in character.


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4: Unter der Linden

Unter der Linden, (Under the linden tree) is a minnesang – a love song – of the famous German composer Walter von der Vogelweide (c .1170 – c. 1230). The minnesinger were poets and musicians mainly of aristocratic descent, that ‘bloomed’ between the 12 and 14th centuries. The love that is described in these songs is noble and emphasizes faith and duty. This song describes the secret meeting od two lovers under the linden tree. The sole/only witness of the meeting is a nightingale and the young girl, who describes the scene, hopes that it won’t betray their secret.


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5: Palästinalied

Walter von der Vogelweide is considered, even by his peers, an outstanding and pioneering artist. His work comprises love songs and religious songs and his poetry touches on many issues even political. The Palästinalied is an exceptional sample of Vogelweide’s poetic work. It describes the thrill and awe of the crusaders, as they approach and finally see Jerusalem.


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6: Imperayritz de la ciutat joyosa

The hymn Imperayritz de la ciutat joyosa (Emperess of the joyfull city) is found in the Libre Vermell de Montserrat (dated end of 14th century). The monastery of Montserrat, dedicated to Virgin Mary, was a famous pilgrimage in 14th century Catalonia. According to the introduction of the ‘red book’ the main purpose of the collection was to compile a body songs and dances of religious content for the pilgrims. The precise performance instructions that can be found in the book render is a valuable point of reference for the music of that period.


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7: Can Vei la lauzeta mover

“I thought I knew many things about love, but I know so little”. This is one of the verses from Can Vei la lauzeta mover (When I see the skylark move) by the composer Bernart de Ventadorn (c.1140 – c.1190), probably the most famous french troubadour. His simple melodies and artful poetic lines usually talk about nature and love, often about unrequited love, or love that is hindered by social or class conventions.


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8: A Chantar m’er

A Chantar m’er (I have to sing) is one of the few known songs belonging to a trobairitz, a woman troubadour. The Contessa Beatriz de Dia (end of 12th century) was probably married to Guilheme de Poitier but composed the song for Raimbaut d'Aurenga. In this canso  she laments honestly and without fear, for her abondonment by her love and at the same time she defends her gifts/virtues and her behaviour. She doesn’t understand why he has stopped loving her and now arrogantly despises her.


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9: I have done with phrases











This text by Virginia Woolf was my inspiration. The 2 vocal lines develop without text, within an environment of processed sounds. What they say are phonemes and syllables that don’t have meaning in any known language. Their succession, the way of diction and the timbre are some of the basic elements that impress/imprint each moment while the final meaning comes from everything that each element (voices, instruments, electronic sounds) bear.

Sofia Kamayianni


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“What is the phrase for the moon?And the phrase for love?...I need a howl, a cry… I need no words. Nothing neat. Nothing that comes down with all its feet on the floor. None of those resonances and lovely echoes that break and chime from nerve to nerve in our breasts making wild music, false phrases. I have done with phrases.”


Virginia Woolf - “The Waves”

Lovely Echoes

Program Notes